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New Zealand’s next general election will take place on Satruday, 23 September 2017. 

Kaimahi who are considering standing as candidates, or who have already been confirmed, need to be aware of the State Services Commission guidelines for education institutions. We, as an organisation, need to remain politically impartial.

Te Wānanga o Aotearoa is a government-funded organisation and kaimahi are state servants under the Electoral Act. While kaimahi are able to have political opinions, we must remain politically neutral in our work. This means that our organisation and those who work here must not promote - or be seen to promote - any political party over another.

Regulations about how TWoA and kaimahi must conduct themselves are set out in the Electoral Act 1993 and the State Sector Act 1988. 

These regulations are summarised below.

Key points for kaimahi:
  • Kaimahi have the same political rights and freedoms as other New Zealanders. 
  • Kaimahi who have a close working relationship with Ministers should avoid active involvement in any political activity. 
  • Kaimahi who intend to be involved in any political activity (fundraising, leaflet drops, etc.) should discuss this with their manager. 
  • Kaimahi must not promote a political party on any Te Wānanga o Aotearoa premises or through the use of Te Wānanga o Aotearoa resources. 
  • Kaimahi must not harm the reputation of Te Wānanga o Aotearoa through the use of social networking sites or by making statements to the media.
Key points for candidates:
  • A kaimahi who is standing as a candidate must take leave of absence from their job at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa. The minimum leave of absence period is from Nomination Day, 29 August, until the first working day after Polling Day, 23 September.
  • A kaimahi who wishes to stand as a candidate must notify their manager as soon as possible. Te Wānanga o Aotearoa will need to fill a candidate’s position during the election period.
  • A candidate may ask to present their policies to tauira, but all political parties must be given the opportunity to speak at the same time. Requests must be approved by Hoe Whakatere. Hoe Whakatere may invite all parties to speak on a Te Wānanga o Aotearoa site.
  • If Te Wānanga o Aotearoa is concerned that a candidate holds particularly strong political views, they may be granted leave prior to Nomination Day. 
  • If a kaimahi is elected to Parliament, they will be deemed to have vacated their position with Te Wānanga o Aotearoa.
  • If a kaimahi is unsuccessful as a candidate, they may return to work on the next working day after Polling Day 23 September 2017.

Please whānau, help us protect our organisation. If you have any questions, please discuss these with your manager. These regulations and recommendations are effective immediately and will remain in place until after the election.

Go to http://www.elections.org.nz/home to find out more about the election, and how to enrol to vote.


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Published On: March 29, 2017

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