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Imagine being able to find, use and share data anywhere and at any time in a system that’s not only robust but complies with the law.

Or how about saying goodbye to paper invoices forever and not having to email documents to colleagues?

Hangarau have launched Te Paetara Raraunga, which is about building better and easier ways to find, use, share and retain quality data.

The new system also provides reliable evidence of our business activities and improves our compliance with a raft of legislation.

Subject Matter Expert – Information Management, Tanya Wierzbicka said Te Paetara Raraunga will make information more useable by knowing what we have, where it is and what value it holds for the organisation.

“It means we can focus on the important stuff and confidently destroy the rest, which frees up important resources. We will be using technology to automatically tag information so it is more findable and storing it in places with 24/7 access and the ability to share documents so we no longer need to email copies from one person to the next.”

 Tanya said the new system would mean Te Wānanga o Aotearoa would comply with a raft of legislation.

All publicly-funded entities in Aotearoa are subject to legislation around information management including the Privacy Act, the Evidence Act and the Electronic Transactions Act.
We are also required to meet the requirements of the Public Records Act and the Official Information Act.

To do this, Te Wānanga o Aotearoa will be managing all records of business activities and ensuring they’re identifiable, retrievable and useable. We will also be protecting records from unauthorised alteration or destruction, keeping them for as long as required and disposing of them legally when they're not needed.

Tanya said Te Paetara Raraunga will affect all kaimahi. 

“There will be new places to store documents. No more shared drives or having to be on the network to access your documents. Instead, information will be available 24/7 from the cloud. You will be able to find your documents faster because they will be automatically tagged when they’re uploaded and search results will be more accurate." 

The initial focus is on Kiriwhanake and kaimahi information, she said.

“We are building a people-centric solution so Kiriwhanake can go to one place, click on a kaimahi name tile, and see all the documents related to that person, plus a summary of some of the information which is held about them. Once the solution is up and running, we will be holding digital kaimahi files and doing away with any paper.”

Hangarau are also working alongside Rangatahua to move away from paper invoices to digitize our accounts payable.

TE PAETARA RARAUNGA – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

What does Te Paetara Raraunga mean?

A paetara is the horizontal batten that joins the vertical posts of a whare nui wall. It’s where the photos and history of the marae and the tangata whenua are displayed and archived.
 Raraunga is literally data. It takes on the connotation of data being suspended in a place where it can be put up, taken down and used as needed, where information can be organised and archived.

Why do we need Te Paetara Raraunga?

All publicly funded entities must meet legislation around how they handle their information and records. This ensures accountability for government spending, transparency over business activities and ensures that, as a nation, we preserves information of long term value.

When is it happening?

In 2016, we looked at software to make it easy to file and store digital documents, and to find them again. For the first half of 2017, we are working with Kiriwhanake and Rangatahua. Later in the year, we will be working with Ratonga looking at tauira files.

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Published On: April 12, 2017

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