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National Library kaimahi (from front left) Lynne Vincent, Lani Emery, Arlyn Palconit and DJ Kukutai Jones and (from back left) Hoani Skipper, Greg Marshall and Freda Rawiri will be demonstrating 3D printer use this week

Training for the new technology was held at the organisation’s national library based in Hamilton recently and kaimahi will be handing on their newfound 3D scanning, printing and editing suite skills.
 
Librarian DJ Kukutai Jones says the six-month pilot project will gauge how tauira and kaimahi are relating to and engaging with the 3D printer.

“This new technology will allow students to express their creativity in more dynamic ways which will contribute to their overall learning experience at the wānanga and future successes.

“Instead of drawing on paper and creating their items in 2D, they will be able to design and make solid 3D objects, using this state of the art technology.”

DJ says the software training has boosted team confidence and the library kaimahi are now ready to tackle 3D printer use demonstrations.
A gold coin koha will secure a supervised 3D printer “tutu” for kaimahi and tauira, he says.

If the 3D printer pilot project is sucessful a roll out to other wānanga sites will take place, says National Library lead Greg Marshall.

He says medical researchers are using the 3D-printed transformative technology to replace bones and are working on methods to recreate skin and vital organs starting with the pancreas or liver.

Printable objects also range from firearms to artwork.

Kaimahi made rabbit figurines, pencil cases and matau design fish hooks during their first 3D printer training session.

 


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Published On: 03 June 2015

Article By: Alice Te Puni



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