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Wānanga art tauira Ramona Tahere, Nakita Tilson, Gary Dey at the recent opening of the exhibition He Haonga Tāhuhu Kōrero in Hamilton.

Beautifully crafted work by wānanga art tauira studying at Rāhui Pōkeka, Huntly is on display in the exhibition He Haonga Tāhuhu Kōrero at Hamilton.

For tauira Ramona Tahere the Maunga Kura Toi – Rauangi  (Bachelor of Māori Art – Mixed Media programme) has been a personal journey of discovery.

Her pieces in He Haonga Tāhuhu Kōrero reflect the concepts of tūrangawaewae and the effects of the urban migration for Māori.

“Through my work I share my own story of identity, express my determination to stay connected and show where I belong or sit in the wider world.”

Zena Elliott, the wānanga kaiako for the Huntly-based Bachelor of Arts programme, says the exhibition pieces were inspired and guided by mātauranga Māori.

“Our tauira have explored and sought relevant ways of capturing traditional knowledge through individual and collective creative processes by blending customary Māori painting practice and contemporary art.”

The main aim of the exhibition is to engage with the arts community, bring to light the talents of our tauira and build an audience for Māori art in the Waikato, says Zena.

He Haonga Tāhuhu Kōrero in on display at the Arts Post beside the Waikato Museum until August 3 2015.


For more information on our Toi (Arts) programmes click here or give us a call on 0800 355 553

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Published On: 14 July 2015

Article By: Alice Te Puni

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