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A collection of stunningly eye-catching murals at the new Te Wānanga o Aotearoa Tauranga not only depict the organisation’s values and symbolise local landmarks and pastimes. 

It is also hoped that they will provide an inspirational space for kaimahi to work within.

The new Te Wānanga o Aotearoa campus on 17th Ave in Tauranga features four massive murals designed by Tiaki Terekia, who works as a Team Lead Design at Te Puna Mātauranga.

The murals depict the values of Te Wānanga o Aotearoa; Kotahitanga, Whakapono, Ngā Ture, Aroha and symbolise things pertinent to the rohe of Tauranga Moana.

Margaret Aull, Te Poutiaki Toi for Te Wānanga o Aotearoa, said the murals were a refreshing departure from the approach many organisations took in formalising their values in documents.

With the largest of the artworks standing 10 metres by 2 metres, Margaret said the artworks also created an inspirational environment for tauira and staff to enjoy. 

“The whole idea of putting the murals up is to make our site look like a wānanga. It sets us aside from the likes of Wintec by having our organisation’s values up on the wall so it gets embedded in what we do.”

Margaret said the murals were a collaborative effort between Tiaki, herself and kaimahi in Tauranga who provided ideas of what they wanted to see on the murals including mana whenua, landmarks and pastimes in the area.

She said the murals further revealed how Te Wānanga o Aotearoa had developed its own creative style. 

“For example with the Aroha theme they thought of manaaki and how cruise ships come in and they enjoy Tauranga moana hence a cruise ship being in there. There’s also Mauao being a symbol of aroha and an important place for the tangata whenua.” 

“With Kotahitanga they talked about the marae, kids jumping off the pier doing bombs and Ngā Ture features waka ama, the symbolism being travelling in unity to achieve an outcome.”

Margaret said Tiaki’s distinct style was helping to position Te Wānanga o Aotearoa as one of the most progressive Māori organisations in the arts sphere.

“There’s no other Māori organisation that pumps out as much creative output for documents whether it is government requirement, or brochures or media no other organisation does it like us,” she said.

“TWoA has been very progressive and Tiaki has developed that.”

“At the recent Heal the World conference in Hamilton, it was kind of funny because everyone thought the wananga had done the programme schedule because it is very similar to what Tiaki designs so this suggests he is starting to influence people outside of our organisation.”

Pictures to come.  For more information about courses available at out Tauranga campus click here.

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Published On: 19 January 2016

Article By: James Ihaka



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