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Sasha Beamsley and her Youth Guarantee class with David Tua following a workout with the former boxing champion

You could be forgiven for feeling exhausted after hearing what’s on Sasha Beamsley’s schedule.

The Youth Guarantee kaiako based at the Waitākere campus in Henderson is in charge of a group of 15 taiohi most of whom are 16 and 17 years old.

They’re pathwaying into NCEA level 2 and higher education through fitness - and this means there’s a lot of physical activity.

“We’ve got crossfit today, boxing tomorrow and then there’s swimming on Thursday,” she says.

“We do lots of different things like zuu fitness – the animal movements that are crazy hard and very sore but they get through it. We are also doing a swim programme, and Turama a water safety programme that teaches them how to be safe around the water by collecting kaimoana.”

Because every day involves travel offsite to gyms, boxing gyms, swimming pools and the like, it also means Sasha is kept busy completing offsite activity forms, which she completes in advance of her outings. 

The offsite activity forms, which are found on Te Kete, identify the basics including the type of activity, where it is taking place, with whom and when.

But the forms also ensure that kaimahi identify potential hazards at the site and how they’ll mitigate them.

They ensure any necessary permits for the activity are obtained, safety equipment (if needed) is available, procedures for any emergencies are known and communications are organised in the event of a situation in a remote area.

“I treat these forms like they’re a safety net for the kids,” says Sasha. 

“When I’m filling out the form I think about who’s going to be there, who could be helping me and who may need our phone numbers in case of an emergency.”

“You also need to note if there is water there or if others attending with me know first aid. When I go to an offsite like to a crossfit gym I expect them to have safety checked their facilities but when we get there we have to safety check them as well.”

Sasha says with the numbers in her class she never attends an offsite activity without any support.

After completing her Offsite Activity form she submits it to her manager, who in turn forwards this on to the manager of education delivery.

“My whakaaro is around the safety of the child first and treating them like my own children,” says Sasha.

“But if something happens to anyone when I take them offsite it doesn’t fall on the organisation but myself so really it’s also about keeping myself safe.” 

“It’s pretty much an every day thing. It’s part of what you have to do, part of planning as a kaiako.”

 
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