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A new Te Wānanga o Aotearoa programme gives tauira the skills to increase their business nous and their knowledge of kaupapa Māori.

Mana Ora is a home-based learning programme in which tauira learn about the basics of building their business while immersing themselves in kaupapa Māori.

Programme manager Home Based Learning, Robert Wetere said the nine-month, Level 3 programme is designed to motivate tauira to consider business ownership and entrepreneurship as a way of creating financial well being.

The programme, which started earlier this month, has a strong focus on mentoring.

Figures from within the Māori business network provide business support and experience to tauira or business start-ups.

“The programme shows tauira how the philosophies and operations of Māori businesses differ from others so it could benefit people needing specific skills in te ao Māori to advance their career prospects,” said Robert. 

“People who do this programme will develop their te reo and tikanga Māori skills and will be able to apply this knowledge in both cultural and business situations.”

He said Mana Ora would benefit any person considering business and self-employment as personal aspirations or individuals wanting to work for a Māori business or organisation.

“It can help to movitate these people who have an established business or those wanting to transform an idea into a business with a kaupapa Māori lens,” said Robert.

“The difference with this programme is it takes a te ao Māori approach.”

Data from Statistics New Zealand from 2015 shows that entrepreneurship and interest in small business among Māori is on the increase with 660 significant small to medium Māori enterprises.

About 20 per cent of these SMEs export to 53 countries.

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