Skip Content
webisodes

A series of webisodes – a first for Te Wānanga o Aotearoa – will explain legal issues that affect kaimahi in their daily work.

The 13 webisodes that are by kaimahi for kaimahi feature familiar TWoA faces who discuss how The Privacy Act, Fair Trading Act and Copyright Act affect what we do.

The webisodes examine the importance of complying with these laws to ensure the safety of Te Wānanga o Aotearoa and its kaimahi and use everyday examples that help to clarify where breaches of the law could occur.

Julia Steenson, who is the senior legal advisor – Taumatua and produced the short videos with the help of the creative team from Te Ipurau, said the webisodes would help kaimahi learn about the New Zealand laws that they need to know for their work.

“They will be available for you to enjoy, while learning things to assist your mahi, via Schoox (thanks to Hangarau) in the New Year,” said Julia.

Can’t wait to see them? Me neither…so let’s take a sneak peek whānau….https://youtu.be/Xw13ekdewsU



 Back to news & events

Published On: 16 December 2015

Article By: James Ihaka



Other Articles

  • 19 January, 2021

    Sarah gets cooking in Kaitaia

    What started out as a simple idea to make a little extra cash selling donuts at the market has turned into a successful foodtruck venture for Kaitaia couple Sarah and Tokoa Aumata.

  • 19 January, 2021

    Fine dining for volunteers

    Volunteers at the Te Wānanga o Aotearoa national waka ama sprint champs at Lake Karāpiro work hard for long hours but are always assured of a decent feed thanks to the tireless work of Hone Mutu and his team.

  • 19 January, 2021

    Local club tastes early success at waka ama

    A fledgling waka ama club formed on the shores of Lake Karāpiro just three years ago has picked up its first ever medal at the Te Wānanga o Aotearoa national waka ama sprint champs.

  • 26 November, 2020

    New community outreach approach to Rongoā in Rotorua

    A new “community outreach” approach is being taken to teaching Rongoā (traditional Māori healing) in Rotorua.