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Toi Hiko Workshop: Designers and tauira work together in Hastings last week. 

Professional development for Te Wānanga o Aotearoa kaimahi is also playing an important role in tauira success.

A team of five graphic designers from Te Puna Mātauranga in Te Awamutu - along with Hangarau support – spent two days visiting the Toimairangi Hastings Campus as part of their professional development.

The team - headed by Team Lead Design Tiaki Terekia and including designers Aroha Moeke, Maui Taewa, Hika Taewa, Hakopa Pore and Hangarau technician Patrick Waenga – attended a workshop with talented artists and Maunga Kura Toi kaiako Sandy Adsett and Chris Bryant and also hosted a module on computer graphic design for tauira enrolled on the Maunga Kura Toi programme.

Aroha says the tauira really engaged with the graphic design workshop and quickly picked up the skills required to transfer their art from the canvas to the computer screen.

“They had the software on their computers already but didn’t know how to use it,” she says.

“We showed them how to use shapes, to rotate things, and to make robots out of those shapes. Then we taught them to use curves to make kowhaiwhai patterns.  We showed them how to make their own business cards, so they can promote themselves at art shows, and their own logos. Once they had the basics, they were away. They asked if we were there all week.”

For their own professional development, the team were hosted by Sandy and Chris in a workshop which aimed to enhance their toi Māori skills.

Aroha says the tauira were eager to help out and show them the ropes.

“The tauira all came to help, showed us how to hold a paint brush, things like that,” Aroha says.

“It was really good.”

Tiaki says the visit proved so successful, he hoped similar visits could be arranged to other campuses.

“We did some great networking and hope to do the same with other tauira and perhaps make the workshop part of their studies” he says.

“It’s good to get out there and share our knowledge and the kaiako were very open to the idea. It’s all about the tauira and kaiako and supporting them.”


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Published On: 30 Aug, 2016

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