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From next year, Te Wānanga o Aotearoa will be offering its new Kaitiakitanga: Postgraduate Diploma in Bicultural Professional Supervision programme.

The one-year, Level 8 programme is for graduates from any field who want to become qualified supervisors and for people wanting to strengthen their professional practice.

The course is a part of the changes to programme provision that are occurring at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa, and is the result of a review of the current level 7 programme, where there was a clear indication that the programme should move to postgraduate.

Lead Hauora & Social Services Wheturangi Walsh-Tapiata said the Postgraduate Diploma in Bicultural Professional Supervision replaces the existing graduate diploma in Professional Supervision (Biculturalism in Practice), Level 7.

She said there was a misconception that the qualification was only for graduates in the social work field.

“It’s for graduates from any field who want to become Kaitiaki or qualified supervisors. This could be social work, or teaching, or mātauranga Māori. It gives them supervisory skills and tools that they’re able to use within their specific fields. It’s quite an exciting space.”

The programme will be offered at Māngere, Mangakōtukutuku, Porirua, Whirikoka and Papaiōea. 

“My understanding is that it will be the first time that Whirikoka and Papaiōea have run postgraduate programmes at their sites,” said Wheturangi.

Wheturangi said the programme would produce kaitiaki with a clearer understanding of the way in which they work that is underpinned by a kaupapa Māori perspective.

“It is really an expansion of our uara and our takepū.”

“We have found as a result of our consultation that people are eager to clearly articulate kaitaikitanga in the context of their work but even more to consider the benefits that this qualification could have to their lives in their whānau and the activities they’re involved with in their communities.”

“The extensive consultation with our stakeholders tells us that there is real interest in this programme and one that is needed for our communities.”

There’s already considerable interest in the programme both from TWoA kaimahi and externally.

“It is an excellent qualification for kaimahi to consider their kaitiaki role in their lives and their mahi.”

“Kaimahi attended a conference recently in Tamaki, and as a result they already have 40 expressions of interest even though the programme hasn’t been approved.”

Wheturangi said the new programme would go-ahead pending approval from the New Zealand Qualifications Authority. 

The initial feedback she’s had is promising, and a decision would be made very soon.

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