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Tamaki Herenga Waka

The Tāmaki Herenga Waka Festival is set to take place at the Viaduct Events Centre in Auckland to showcase the city and counter the traffic departing for Auckland Anniversary long weekend.


Te Wānanga o Aotearoa is once again sponsoring the free, family-friendly festival to acknowledge and celebrate Tāmaki Makaurau history, heritage and contemporary Māori culture.

The Auckland Council event will feature workshops and talks, entertainment, crafts, lots of kai, traditional games, healing, tā moko, and storytelling centered on the stories of the 19 mana whenua.

A TWoA recruitment site will be located at the entrance of the Viaduct Centre, featuring the talents of the Māngere Campus whakairo, raranga and tivaevae whanau who will exhibit in the space as well as provide activities and live demonstrations.

Stalls from Māori Television, rongoa Māori and kirituhi artists will be our neighbours and Auckland Art Gallery will have an exhibition with activities on site too.

The on-water events will include tribal waka races, have-a-go waka experiences with the presence of the region’s only active waka tauā, Te Kotuiti Tuarua.  

An outdoor stage will also host our performing arts tauira at set intervals throughout the weekend, along with performances by established artists and Auckland’s top kapa haka groups.

On Saturday 28 January, in tribute to the late Dr Ngapo ‘Bub’ Wehi and his wife Pimia, the main stage will kick off with a performance by Te Waka Huia.

Across the three days, some of New Zealand’s brightest musical stars, including Whirimako Black, Ria Hall, Seth Haapu, Rob Ruha, Ranea Aperahama and Majic Paora, will shine with emerging musicians - designed to nurture the next generation.

The festival's finale will honour the life and music of Prince Tui Teka, Maui ‘Dalvanius’ Prime and Sir Howard Morrison with special performances from the people mentored by these giants, including the Patea Māori Club and Howie Morrison Jnr.

This is an alcohol and smoke-free event.

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Published On: 17 Jan, 2017

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