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TWoA staff

The Te Wānanga o Aotearoa stand at Te Kahu o Te Amorangi Te Matatini 2017 is attracting visitors and EOIs beyond expectations.

The stand, in a row with those of other strategic partners, stands out with its stylised māhau and Whanganui kaiwhakahaere rawa Charlie Turia says its proving hugely popular.

“We’ve had heaps of visitors at the stand, it’s really good,” she says.

“The moko stencils are really taking off and the Musically feature is good too.”

Musically is a social media platform for creating and sharing short music videos.

The stand is being staffed by kaimahi from around the Te Ihu takiwā , with kaimahi from Wellington, Porirua, Palmerston North, Whanganui and Heretaunga taking shifts to speak to visitors and provide information for prospective tauira.

They are being helped by kaimahi from Te Puna Matauranga.

Kaiārahi Matua Awhimai Huka, who is also helping with the stand, says the number of visitors has been impressive and the stand has been effective in attracting a range of people interested in what Te Wānanga o Aotearoa has to offer.

“The stands got great appeal and it’s really good to see so many people coming through,” she says.
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Published On: Feb 23. 2017

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