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Spark employees graduated Hei Tauawhi Māori Cultural Awareness programme

Te Wānanga o Aotearoa is helping one of New Zealand’s biggest corporates build their awareness of te ao Māori.

TWoA, along with broadcaster and kapa haka expert Kingi Kiriona, delivered the Hei Tauawhi Māori Cultural Awareness programme – a mix of virtual and in class learning – to staff at telecommunications provider Spark.

The programme’s first cohort graduated at Rangiāowhia Marae at Raroera campus last Saturday.

Hei Tauawhi Māori Cultural Awareness programme is a course for corporate businesses and introduces staff to basic te reo Māori, correct pronunciation, kawa and tikanga.

The programme also provides an insight into how Māori conduct business and how concepts like manaakitanga affect the way they do things.

Spark staff believe the programme would help them build their own cultural identity and would ensure they would “stand proud in our national identity”.

“The course was a combination of virtual learning and physical lessons at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa and is an example of where we’ve combined a business opportunity with delivering social good.”

 
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