Skip Content
Paraone Gloyne

A personal social experiment started three years ago was recognised nationally at the Māori Language Commission’s 14th Ngā Tohu Reo Māori, National Māori Language Awards on Friday night.

Te Wānanga o Aotearoa Poutiaki Reo/Tikanga Paraone Gloyne initiated Mahuru Māori in 2014 as a way of promoting the use of te reo Māori in our everyday lives.

Mahuru Māori challenged participants to communicate using only te reo Māori for the month of September, regardless of who you speak to or where and when you speak it.

The initiative on Friday was judged the winner of the Mātauranga section of the awards while Paraone was also a finalist for the individual award.

From its small beginnings, Mahuru Māori has grown each year. It was initially laid out as a challenge for Te Wānanga o Aotearoa kaimahi but has quickly been embraced throughout the country and even attracts international participants. In 2017, more than 1400 people joined the Mahuru Māori Facebook page.

People taking part in Mahuru Māori can choose to speak te reo Māori for either one day per week, a whole week or the entire month of September.

 Back to news & events

Published On:

Article By:



Other Articles

  • 24 January 2023

    From Kenya to Aotearoa - Toi and its many connection's

    Jennifer Dickerson, a self-proclaimed "Third Culture Kid" due to her unique upbringing around the world, has discovered who she is through art.

  • 19 December 2022

    Masters opens door to book project

    Juggling work as Communications Advisor for Te Wānanga o Aotearoa while completing his masters, and writing a book has meant Tracey Cooper’s plate has been rather full recently. Fortunately with his exegesis completed, book published and work in wind-down mode for Christmas he’s able to take a breather and reflect on his journey through study.

  • 15 December 2022

    ‘Rererangi ki te Ao’ Opens doors at Kirikiriroa Airport

    Te Wānanga o Aotearoa Kairuruku and Pouwhenua Whakairo (master carver), Professor Kereti G. Rautangata, (nō Ngāti Mahanga, Ngāti Koroki Kahukura) and his team of carvers have left their mark on a significant piece of the Waikato landscape.

  • 14 December 2022

    Making a difference with mau rākau

    Tamiaho Searancke, who started learning the art of mau rākau at age three from his kuia and kaumatua, has guided another cohort of tauira through their journey of learning the ancient Māori martial art.