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Kirituhi FB Ad Image

More than 71,000 people have applied the Kirituhi Facebook Camera Effect developed by Te Wānanga o Aotearoa since it was launched at the WOMAD 2018.

Facebook users from around the world have been fascinated with Kirituhi and are applying the camera effect to selfies and sharing online.

Kirituhi allows our culture to be shared respectfully with non-Māori. Kirituhi means ‘skin’ and ‘tuhi means ‘to write, draw, and record."

Te Wānanga o Aotearoa Social Media Advisor Ross McDougall who developed the filter alongside an in-house Creative team and Poutiaki (Reo / Tikanga), said he was humbled by the overwhelmingly positive response.

“Our intention was to use technology to celebrate Māori culture and launching the Kirituhi Facebook Camera Effect at WOMAD 2018 was the perfect time to do it.”

Te Wānanga o Aotearoa is a programme partner of WOMAD 2018.

Try the Kirituhi Facebook Effect now: www.facebook.com/fbcameraeffects/tryit/355365451537674

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