Skip Content
Te-Ururoa-Flavell

Te Wānanga o Aotearoa welcomed its new chief executive today with a rousing haka pōwhiri at its Te Awamutu headquarters as Te Ururoa Flavell took up his new role as head of the country’s second largest tertiary organisation.

Te Ururoa is widely respected across Māoridom and the political spectrum and holds a Master of Arts in Māori Studies and Anthropology from the University of Waikato.

He is a strong advocate for te reo Māori and has always had a passion for education, being a former teacher and principal of St Stephens School and chief executive of Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuirangi.

He said today he was committed to doing his very best in his new role as Te Taiurungi.

“I was humbled by the warm welcome by Te Wānanga o Aotearoa as I enter a new part of my life,” he said.

“And I was humbled by the number of people that came with me to support me in my new role and I trust the people who supported and spoke about me will be proud of what I achieve in this role.”

Te Wānanga o Aotearoa chair Vanessa Eparaima said she was delighted to appoint someone with the experience Te Ururoa brings to the role.

“Te Ururoa has a strong track record for his leadership and advocacy for Māori especially in education,” said Vanessa.

“He brings a reputation of hard work and leading from the front alongside a background of highly capable leadership.”

Te Ururoa replaces Dr Jim Mather, who did not seek reappointment to the role after five years in the job.

Te Wānanga o Aotearoa has about 32,000 students and 1700 staff at more than 80 sites around the country. It provides education from certificate to masters and delivers 66% of all te reo Māori education in the tertiary sector.

 Back to news & events

Published On:

Article By:



Other Articles

  • 24 July, 2020

    Time to make Matariki a public holiday

    This month we once again greeted Matariki as the star constellation rose above the eastern horizons to herald a new year in te Ao Māori.

  • 13 July, 2020

    A star in his own right

    Professor Rangi Mataamua, the Tūhoe astronomer who worked with Te Wānanga o Aotearoa to develop the popular Te Iwa o Matariki roadshow exhibition, has been awarded the Prime Minister’s science communications prize from the Royal Society of New Zealand.

  • 6 July, 2020

    Karate couple explore parenting prowess

    It’s parenting and leadership – and how to do this even better - that has been the focus of their current participation in the two-year He Waka Hiringa Masters of Applied Indigenous Knowledge programme at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa.

  • 3 July, 2020

    Long-term benefits of business study

    It’s taken years of hard work and Alex credits his business studies with Te Wānanga o Aotearoa as providing the base from which the company has grown.