Skip Content
Visitors to the Te Wānanga o Aotearoa stand at Te Matatini ki te Ao 2019, have three options. 

The first, to win a portable storage device, is to sing a song.  

The second; perform the poi or the third to pick their top nine teams who are most likely to feature on the final day of the competition. 

Not surprisingly, most choose option number three and even less of a surprise is who is in their top nine. 

“You’ve got to go with Whangarā, they’re the defending champions,” says Jeff, who mentions he has a cousin from the East Coast. 

Other mentions include former winners Te Waka Huia, Waihīrere, Te Whānau ā Apanui, Te Iti Kahurangi and Mōtai Tangata Rau. 

The TWoA stand at the Westpac Stadium is a hive of activity and the Porirua and Papaiōea kaimahi who are running it are attracting visitors and good expressions of interest in our programmes. 

Rawiri Shedlock, a kaiwhakahaere ako from Papaiōea, says the drive for EOIs is focused on TWoA’s business programmes. 

“We are marketing our programmes across the country and all of our campuses,” he says. 

“Our biggest drive is to increase interest in our business courses and performing arts here in Porirua but of course, most of the interest seems to be in our te reo Māori programmes.” 

Rawiri said that by lunchtime on the first day of competition at Te Matatini ki te Ao 2019, TWoA had registered a surprising number of expressions of interest. 

Te Wānanga o Aotearoa is a strategic partner at Te Matatini ki te Ao 2019. 
 Back to news & events

Published On:

Article By:



Other Articles

  • 19 June, 2024

    Art on show at curators’ wānanga

    Around 40 Māori curators from museums, galleries, archives and museums gathered at O-Tāwhao Marae in Te Awamutu over the weekend for their annual hui aimed at networking, sharing knowledge and discussing how to grow Māori capacity in the sector.

  • 20 June 2024

    Teen mum turned business owner with support from Wānanga youth programme

    Falling pregnant at 15 was a big surprise for Paeroa teen Ella-Grace Tissingh, but with the support of the Youth Services programme at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa, she’s managed to gain NCEA level 2, get her full license, and start up a successful business.

  • 06 June 2024

    Raranga programme helps funeral director to connect with traditional cultural practices

    Descended from a long line of undertakers, it’s no surprise that it was tangi that brought Delano Murray (Ngāti Kurī) to Heretaunga, where he’s a funeral director for Simplicity Funerals and studying Toi Paematua Level 5 in raranga with Te Wānanga o Aotearoa.

  • 16 May 2024

    Kawerau local lives out childhood dream of learning to weave

    As a young girl, Barbara Wheto always had a fascination with harakeke and the art of weaving. But growing up in an era where being Māori and Māori culture were scorned upon, she was never encouraged to explore the art form.