Skip Content
Lomilomi practitioner Kawika Aipa, from Hawai’i, presents his model of kaitiakitanga

Lomilomi practitioner Kawika Aipa, from Hawai’i, presents his model of kaitiakitanga.

More than 80 health professionals gathered in Mangere in November for an annual conference that saw them present their ideas and models of kaitiakitanga (supervision) developed over the year-long Kaitiakitanga - Postgraduate Diploma in Bicultural Professional Supervision course.

The course is unique in that it uses mātauranga Māori as the core of its supervision curriculum in a range of disciplines. It is aimed at professionals with at least five years’ experience working in areas such as social work, health, nursing, midwifery, counselling and education or in their community, iwi or hapu.

The Kaitiakitanga - Bicultural Professional Supervision National Conference 2019 took place over four days and saw tauira from around the country present their models of kaitiakitanga practice to a panel of judges.

Students from Te Wānanga o Aotearoa campuses in Papaiōea, Whirikoka, Tauranga, Mangakōtukutuku and Manukau attended the conference, which featured two days of presentations, along with guest speakers and other presentations from service providers.

Kairuruku social work Jodie Owen and Papaiōea kaiako Lewis Stephens assess one of the presentations 
Kairuruku social work Jodie Owen and Papaiōea kaiako Lewis Stephens assess one of the presentations.

Since it was first developed in in 2017, the course has proved incredibly popular, with the Mangere campus now offering two cohorts each year and a waiting list already established for 2020.
Mangere kaiako and conference organiser Kelly Leef-Tate says the course is designed to address the need for confident, competent and conscious kaitiaki/supervision practitioners in a range of disciplines.

“The programme culminates in presenting at this conference and demonstrating the validity of the bicultural model of kaitiakitanga/supervision students have developed during the course. This also contributes to the growing indigenous body of knowledge on kaitiakitanga.”

Kelly says the course is run through a combination of classes and weekend noho marae, meaning students are able to keep their jobs while they study.

They also gain important skills which are proving increasingly popular in the workplace, she says.

“The unique bicultural aspect of the course provides our students with the knowledge, skillset and professional competencies to offer their clients the quality of service they deserve.”

 Back to news & events

Published On: 15 November, 2019

Article By: Tracey Cooper



Other Articles

  • 26 November, 2021

    New community outreach approach to Rongoā in Rotorua

    A new “community outreach” approach is being taken to teaching Rongoā (traditional Māori healing) in Rotorua.

  • 19 November, 2020

    Raranga and whatu provide deep rewards

    Besides producing work of great beauty, raranga and whatu offer a way to connect with tīpuna and to one's inner self, as well as providing spiritual healing, say kaiako and tauira involved in a community exhibition in Te Kūiti.

  • 19 November, 2020

    Sponsorship to help grow Waka Ama in lower North Island

    A new event sponsorship for lower North Island waka ama events scheduled for the next two weekends will help contribute to growing the number of people involved in the sport.

  • 17 November, 2020

    Te reo o te Pākehā taha rua - the voice of a Pākehā of two sides

    Fluent te reo speaker James Barnes straddles the Māori and Pākehā worlds, as well as the shared space between, armed with well-honed skills developed from a rare set of experiences for a Pākehā.