Skip Content

Including Māori values in their organisational structure is just one of the ways Auckland Transport is building its knowledge base around te Ao Māori and mātauranga Māori.

Māori Responsiveness Programme Manager Lillian Tahuri says when the values were re-written earlier this year, there was support from across the organisation for more Māori input.

“As a consequence we now have Māori values in Auckland Transport,” she says.

Those values – Auahatanga, Whanaungatanga, Tiakitanga and Manaakitanga – guide the organisation and Lillian says there is a strong desire among Auckland Transport staff to learn more about te Ao Māori.

Last year Lillian was part of the first cohort from Auckland Transport to complete the Level 3 Te Whāinga o te Ao Tikanga programme at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa and she says the course helped staff immensely.

Auckland Transport works with 19 different tribal organisations, meaning there’s a genuine need – and desire - for staff to have an understanding of tikanga, she says.

“They understand that we are building relationships and these have to be enduring, not just from one project to the next.”

“Everyone wanted more knowledge and understanding,” she says.

“They want to know what’s going on when they go to a marae, not just sit there wondering what’s going on. It makes them more aware of their own personal behaviour in that space.”

Lillian enrolled in the course to support her colleagues but also “because I just wanted a more in-depth knowledge around tikanga at a personal level”.

While Auckland Transport runs internal tikanga, te reo Māori pronunciation and Treaty of Waitangi workshops, Lillian says the Te Wānanga o Aotearoa course provides more depth to their learning.

She hopes more staff will be able to study tikanga with Te Wānanga o Aotearoa and says it has produced real benefits for the organisation.

“At Auckland Transport there are Māori-focused programmes on road safety, infrastructure engagement and the implementation of te reo Māori across the transport network.”

 Back to news & events

Published On: 29 June, 2020

Article By: Tracey Cooper



Other Articles

  • 8 March 2021

    From curtains, clothing and costumes comes creativity

    Nephi Tupaea won the Supreme Award for costume design at Auckland’s Pasifika Festival in the early 90s and is now back in Heretaunga studying towards a Diploma in Indigenous and Māori Art at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa.

  • 26 February, 2021

    Kanorau Digital to help digitally excluded New Zealanders

    One in five New Zealanders lacks the skills to safely use the internet for online banking and grocery shopping or don’t know how to download apps on a mobile phone, a report shows.

  • 22 February, 2021

    New forestry course offers excellent job prospects

    Given the strong demand for workers in the Tairāwhiti forestry sector, a new course from Te Wānanga o Aotearoa offers graduates extremely healthy job prospects, says course kaiako (teacher) Sonny Hitaua.

  • 02 March 2021

    Reconnecting with te ao Māori through tikanga

    A mainstay of champion kapa haka Te Waka Huia for most of her life, Pīmia won the coveted title of Manukura Wahine in 2017. Off the stage, Pīmia teaches Te Hapūtanga o te ao Tikanga at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa in Gisborne.