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Lisa Graham - Tauira, Kanorau Digital

Lisa Graham rarely used the internet. She didn’t know the basics of how to use a computer or how to get around the web. She was also afraid of being scammed online.

However, doing the Kanorau Digital programme from Te Wānanga o Aotearoa has changed all of that!

Previously, the 52-year-old cleaner, had a very limited understanding of how to do a basic internet search on Google while using email and online calendars were difficult ideas to grasp.

She’d always preferred to do her shopping in person rather than going online – which presented problems during last year’s COVID-19 lockdown.

“I’d never go on to the internet because I’d always been scared of hackers and stuff like that,” says Lisa.

“I really was always afraid to shop online because I’d heard about people being done out of their money so I’d leave these things to my daughter to do for me. My daughter would say ‘mum, download the Trademe app and I’d say can you do it for me please’.”

“And with shopping I’d always preferred to shop there and then in person.”

Lisa is among the estimated 500,000 digitally-excluded New Zealanders who have limited access or no access to, or won’t or can’t use, digital technology according to 2018 Census figures.

Because the Census was completed online, these figures could actually be higher.

Lisa knew she needed to learn how to navigate the web safely and learn how to make the most of her mobile phone, so she enrolled on Kanorau Digital, a TWoA short course that’s being offered at locations throughout New Zealand.

Kanorau Digital students learn how to send and check emails, and how to use tools to create, organise and connect with the digital world.

In the course, participants explore day-to-day tasks such as basic online filing, photo sharing, online shopping and banking and how to stay safe when they’re online.

Lisa recommends the course, which is run over one day (6 hours) or over two days (3 hours per day).

She’s learned the basics of safe internet navigation, how to file information, communication tools and how she can get more out of her mobile phone.

“I’m going online a lot more now and feel more confident with the internet. I also know how to use my phone better,” she says.

“Everything is going online now, so it makes sense to learn these things. It’s really good for people to learn it because it saves time and money and it keeps people in touch.”

Find out more about our Kanorau Digital programme


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Published On: 20 April 2021

Article By: James Ihaka



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