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Te Wānanga o Aotearoa acting chief executive Nepia Winiata and Te Pūkenga chief executive Stephen Town following the signing of the memorandum of understanding

Te Wānanga o Aotearoa acting chief executive Nepia Winiata and Te Pūkenga chief executive Stephen Town following the signing of the memorandum of understanding.

Te Pūkenga and Te Wānanga o Aotearoa (TWoA) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to collaborate in a partnership that will serve current and future generations of New Zealanders through upskilling and access to training opportunities.

The two tertiary education organisations this week formalised the MoU which reflects the work and the commitment of both to boost achievement, skills and training.

It acknowledges the national reach of TWoA and Te Pūkenga, and commits both organisations to increasing the number of people upskilling in trades and skills-based vocations.

Acting chief executive of Te Wānanga o Aotearoa, Nepia Winiata said:

“TWoA is excited by this new partnership with Te Pūkenga and the opportunities it presents for our organisations and communities moving forward.

“TWoA has a long history of working with our most vulnerable communities and with those unable to access tertiary education opportunities in remote locations. Our agreement with Te Pūkenga ensures we are positioned strongly to deliver on our mission of tauira success.

“Under the agreement we will work co-operatively and collaboratively to identify and develop areas of mutual interest that in particular contribute to the advancement of the interest of whānau, hapū and hāpori (communities),” Mr Winiata said.

Te Pūkenga Chief Executive Stephen Town said it could mean any ‘arranging training’ functions transferred from Transitional Industry Training Organisations (TITOs) to Te Pūkenga could be delivered by the two organisations together, or could be transferred from Te Pūkenga to Te Wānanga o Aotearoa to deliver.

“This is a big step and acknowledges the rangatiratanga of Te Wānanga o Aotearoa and the unique expertise they hold,” Mr Town said.

‘Arranging training’ is a function currently delivered by TITOs for work-based learning such as traineeships and apprenticeships and includes organising the delivery, assessment and monitoring of training, development of training resources and supporting employers and learners.

“Ultimately we will be measured by our ability to improve outcomes for learners and employers. We believe an interactive, positive and balanced partnership with Te Wānanga o Aotearoa can help us do that,” Mr Town said.

The two parties will also honour and acknowledge their commitments as Te Tiriti of Waitangi partners and work together by incorporating tikanga Māori and the principles of whakapapa (familial ties), whakawhanaungatanga (relationships), manaakitanga (consideration), kaitiakitanga (environmental consciousness) and rangatiratanga (authority).

An Action Plan will be developed to guide the implementation of the partnership.

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Published On: May 13, 2021

Article By: James Ihaka



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