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Bachelor of Education Alumni: Callie Raureti

Teaching runs in the family for Callie Raureti.

So, it was no surprise when she went on to complete a Bachelor of Education with Te Wānanga o Aotearoa (TWoA) in 2012.

“I actually come from a family of school teachers, with many of my aunties in the profession,” says Callie, who has been the Deputy Principal at Owhata School in Rotorua for almost 3 years.

Callie was two years into her teaching career when her sister, Stevee Raureti began her Bachelor of Education with TWoA.

“We currently teach at the same school. We’re privileged to be teaching together and working together, particularly in the areas of te reo Māori and Māori performing arts. Our own tamariki are involved in our day-to-day school life attending kura with us. It’s very much a whānau pathway.”

The 34-year-old mother was drawn to study at TWoA because of her ability to relate to the unique Māori learning environment and the option to study locally.

“I found the kaiako (teachers) very supportive and the nature of the campus relevant to me, particularly in relation to my Māori culture.”

Callie had three job offers in the same month that she graduated but she credits much of her success as a kaiako to her whānau, the tamariki she has taught and the colleagues she has had throughout her teaching career.

“Ehara taku toa i te toa takitahi, ēngari taku toa he toa takitini - Success is not the work of an individual, but the work of many.”

Callie had always planned to study and become a teacher but her driving force has been to inspire other young Māori that they are also capable of success.

“I want young Māori tamariki to know these types of jobs and opportunities aren’t just for others, they are for them. If they can see themselves in the people that are in front of them, they are more likely to believe and push themselves to achieve great things.”

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Published On: 06 October 2021

Article By: Cassia Ngaruhe



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