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  • 24 May, 2016

    Realist painter gets real about learning tikanga

    Award-winning realist painter Artist Zarahn Southon has drawn comparisons between his education in traditional figurative painting and cultural protocol.

  • 24 May, 2016

    Te Ihu takiwā welcomes new managers of education delivery Terry Smith and Dale Harding

    Te Ihu takiwā welcomes new managers of education delivery Terry Smith and Dale Harding

  • 24 May, 2016

    Te Kura Reo Ora o Te Wānanga o Aotearoa 2016

    The call is going out for the first of two kura reo ora for Te Wānanga o Aotearoa for 2016.

  • 24 May, 2016

    Gaylene falls in love with TWoA vision

    Social Services Kaiako Gaylene Stevens believes the new vision and mission for Te Wānanga o Aotearoa “clears away the clutter” and makes it easier for her to understand.

  • 24 May, 2016

    Daughters for the return home to Te Wānanga o Aotearoa

    Two generations of the same whānau have returned home from different parts of the world to undertake study with Te Wānanga o Aotearoa.

  • 24 May, 2016

    From a dark past to a future one on stage under bright lights

    Joe Harwood spent his childhood trying to figure out where he belonged. Now it looks to be performing on stage, thanks to his new-found pathway studying music at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa.

  • 24 May, 2016

    Mixing materials and motherhood

    Nadia Poole is making a name for herself by mixing her love of material with motherhood.

  • Top award at the 2016 Distance Education Association of New Zealand Awards

    Te Wānanga o Aotearoa Kaitiaki Taonga Donna Dyet and graphic designer Hika Taewa last year designed and developed a mobile app with the support of He Ātea Taonga (the resource development team) to support learners in the level 4 carpentry course. The course is part of the Certificate in Applied Technology offered by Te Wānanga o Aotearoa. The app provided breakthroughs for tauira including easier access to relevant programme content, better learner engagement and an increased likelihood of educational success for tauira. The judges said the project identified and addressed a learning need, developed a flexible and distance learning response that was effectively implemented. They also commended the project for demonstrating good practice in the area of culturally responsive pedagogy. Donna said it was great for Te Wānanga o Aotearoa to be recognised nationally in the field of innovative e-learning. She said feedback from kaiako and tauira about the use and impact of the resource had been encouraging. There was also interest from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, who will be discussing the app’s possibilities for the industry with Donna. “We were contacted by Jeremy Sole (Regional Knowledge Broker, Northern, Building System and Performance MBIE) who had heard about the app and wanted to have a look at possibilities for applying the concept to compliance apps in the industry,” she said. The DEANZ Award is designed to promote and reward excellence in e-learning, distance, open and flexible learning. Awards are made biennially for projects that advance understanding of best practice in e-learning, distance, open and flexible learning in New Zealand; are original or innovative in concept or application; and are relevant to and whose outcomes are useful to the e-learning, distance, open and flexible-learning community. The awards evening is part of the DEANZ conference that hosted around 200 delegates at the University of Waikato from 17-20 April.

  • Tamariki and passion for te reo brings Waikato couple home

    For more than 20 years Kumeroa and Jubilee Poutapu carved out careers across the ditch in Sydney, but it was their tamariki and passion for te reo Māori that brought them home.

  • Amiria inspired by the wānanga on the Waikato River

    Kaiarahi Mātauranga Māori Amiria O'Malley says taking part in the tirahoe from Hamilton to Huntly on the Waikato River was a ‘wānanga’ in itself.

  • Te Mana Ao Tūroa degree broadens horizons

    Te Mana Ao Tūroa graduate Taroi Rawiri says the Bachelor of Māori Advancement degree he studied at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa has broadened his horizons.

  • Ngā puna o Te Wānanga o Aotearoa : It’s about the whanau

    An ERO review of Te Wānanga o Aotearoa early learning centres has praised the five puna for the positive outcomes they promote for tamariki and their whānau.

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